This toy helicopter is becoming quite the workplace distraction

This toy helicopter is becoming quite the workplace distraction

The conference room names at Facebook are way cooler than ours at @huffingtonpost. Clearly, we need to step it up. (at Facebook NYC)

The conference room names at Facebook are way cooler than ours at @huffingtonpost. Clearly, we need to step it up. (at Facebook NYC)

Inspirational posters everywhere at Facebook HQ in #nyc #instamedia (at Facebook NYC)

Inspirational posters everywhere at Facebook HQ in #nyc #instamedia (at Facebook NYC)

Tags: nyc instamedia
deezlyfe:

Lesss gooo baby!

deezlyfe:

Lesss gooo baby!

Reblogged from SteezLyfe
Reblogged from HuffPost Science
mothernaturenetwork:

First all-carbon solar cell made with nanotubes and buckyballs instead of siliconStanford University research could lead to cheaper, more flexible photovoltaics.

mothernaturenetwork:

First all-carbon solar cell made with nanotubes and buckyballs instead of silicon
Stanford University research could lead to cheaper, more flexible photovoltaics.

Reblogged from Mother Nature Network
Google Adds Resources For Those Affected By Superstorm 

Google is now sending public alerts to users searching for terms related to Superstorm Sandy. The results will appear on Google Search and Google Maps in desktop browsers and on Google Maps for Android mobile devices, as well as on Google Now for Android devices running Jellybean.

From a blog post written by Google Crisis Response’s Nigel Snoad:

Public Alerts provide warnings for natural disasters and emergency situations. They appear based on targeted Google searches, such as [Superstorm Sandy], or with location-based search queries like [New York]. In addition to the alert, you’ll also see relevant response information, such as evacuation routes, crisis maps or shelter locations.

For example, when someone in New York City searches Google for “Superstorm Sandy,” a block of emergency info will appear above the Google Search results and will include links to disaster preparedness tips, Google’s crisis response map, state-by-state responses, local evacuation zone information and more.  (See image above.)

(<em>Catharine Smith, HuffPost</em>)
Google Adds Resources For Those Affected By Superstorm 
Google is now sending public alerts to users searching for terms related to Superstorm Sandy. The results will appear on Google Search and Google Maps in desktop browsers and on Google Maps for Android mobile devices, as well as on Google Now for Android devices running Jellybean.
Public Alerts provide warnings for natural disasters and emergency situations. They appear based on targeted Google searches, such as [Superstorm Sandy], or with location-based search queries like [New York]. In addition to the alert, you’ll also see relevant response information, such as evacuation routes, crisis maps or shelter locations.
For example, when someone in New York City searches Google for “Superstorm Sandy,” a block of emergency info will appear above the Google Search results and will include links to disaster preparedness tips, Google’s crisis response map, state-by-state responses, local evacuation zone information and more.  (See image above.)
(<em>Catharine Smith, HuffPost</em>)
Tags: sandy google

Instagram Gets 10 #Sandy Photos Per Second During Height Of Storm

The story of Hurricane Sandy is largely being told through photos, in part thanks to Instagram, the popular photo-sharing app bought by Facebook this year.
More than 244,000 photos have been posted to Instagram with the hashtag #sandy, according to app founder Kevin Systrom. More than 144,000 more have been posted under #hurricanesandy and another 23,000 photos under #frankenstorm.
“There are now 10 pictures per second being posted with the hashtag #sandy — most are images of people prepping for the storm and images of scenes outdoors,” Systrom said in a statement that was posted to Poynter.
At least one independent site is tracking Instagram photos of Sandy. During Hurricane Irene in August 2011, Peter Ng  and Chris Ackermann, a pair of developers from the New York Times and Facebook, respectively, created the site instacane.com as a landing page for Instagram photos related to the storm. That site is again live for Hurricane Sandy, and can be found here.
— Dino Grandoni, HuffPost